It’s official: Email, texting, and social media are no longer just helpful supplemental business tools. They’ve taken over the whole game. Yes, technology has made many aspects of modern living more convenient and “connected,” but the pendulum has swung too far. Now, people are reluctant to do something as simple as picking up the phone, preferring to shoot off an email instead. And face-to-face meetings—well, they’re almost unheard of.

This “technology takeover” is not without consequence. Misunderstandings abound. Relationships stagnate. Trust is at an all-time low. And all of these issues are at least partially due to the fact that genuine human connections have been replaced by mouse-clicks and keystrokes.

Social media and technology do have their place, but they are not, and never will be, a substitute for in-person interaction. Your physical presence—or at least the sound of your voice—builds trust you can’t even approach with a keyboard, screen, or profile image. If you make the time necessary for personal meetings others will not only remember you, but they will appreciate the effort you put forth.

People don’t just buy your product; they buy you

The time investment shows you really care. It’s a fairly universal truth that human beings want to be valued and appreciated. Spending time with someone else, whether that’s in person, face-to-face on a computer screen, or, if all else fails, via a phone call, is one of the best ways to convey these things. In essence, an investment of time says ‘While there are many other things I could be doing, I’m choosing to spend my time with you. That’s how important I think you are!’

Minutes and hours spent with another person have the power to create a bond that money can’t buy.

You’re better able to give personalized attention. This is perhaps the biggest key to successful sales and the establishment of any long-term relationship. Think about it: It’s hard to multi-task on something unrelated when someone is physically planted in front of you, demanding your attention. Unless you have no problem with blatant rudeness, you’re focusing on the other person, responding not only to what they say, but also to their mood, movements, and many other non-verbal signals. You will read these signs and adjust your behavior accordingly.

Letters on a screen can’t compete with the personal touch. In my experience, when you use someone’s name along with eye contact and an attentive demeanor, they’re more likely to be agreeable and to give you the benefit of the doubt. They know that your time is valuable and that you chose to give it to them. The next time they see you, they will be more relaxed and familiar in your company. And the more visits you have, the more your relationship with that individual strengthens. Trust me, people want to do business with people they know. You can get to know them much better offscreen.

You’re more effective in general. When you’re talking to someone else in real time, you can make progress in real time and solve problems in real time. Thanks to facial expressions, body language, and tone of voice, you’ll usually find out more than just the basics when you have a verbal conversation. When an important client or critical team member is on the other side of the globe, a face-to-face meeting once or twice a year can often be a smart investment.

Facial expressions help get your message across… Did you know that the human face has at least 20 muscles that work in concert to create a myriad of telling facial expressions? Observing those expressions during verbal communication can give you instant feedback about how your message is being received. You can quickly adjust your message on the spot to make it more meaningful or agreeable, and avoid possible misunderstandings.

…So does your body language… Unlike looking at a posed profile shot or any still image sent over email, being face-to-face with another person gives you the opportunity to see the other person’s dynamic reaction and make adjustments to your own message. Real-time body language provides tons of non-verbal cues that are impossible to convey in a text or email.

As humans and social animals, we are naturally wired to get this feedback instantly. We’re also equipped to share our own feelings and attitudes through the way we stand, sit, gesture, and more.

…and so does your tonality. It’s happened to everyone: You send an email that’s laced with sarcasm or humor…which the recipient totally fails to pick up on. Oops! Now you’re left frantically doing damage control. That’s one major reason why texting, emailing, and friending can be great ways to communicate while failing to succeed at relationship building. So the next time you find your mouse hovering over the ‘compose’ button, think about reaching for your phone instead.

Your vulnerability shows (and that’s a good thing!). In the virtual world, you can almost totally control the image you show to other people. You choose the pictures you post on your profile. You censor the information you do and don’t want to share in your messages, posts, and updates. And usually, you can think about and edit what you want to say before pressing “send.” But in a real-time, face-to-face relationship, the other person can see you in 3-D and observe your dynamic, spontaneous behavior, including tone of voice, expression, dress, and body language.

Imperfections and vulnerability make you appear more believable and sincere. Most people will overlook minor foibles in appearance and speech because you are literally there for them. It’s special! This can be a big advantage in the long run. And in the short run, you take precedence over all their virtual relationships.

Like any skill, becoming personable takes practice. A good way to start is to eliminate virtual communication when in-person communication is possible or more effective. Shake hands and come out a winner! Remember, genuine, lasting, and dependable relationships take time and physical presence. High touch beats high tech every time.